Scientific Research Council

  • Stephen Hinshaw
    Stephen Hinshaw, PhD

    Co-Chair
    Scientific Research Council

    Vice-Chair, Department of Psychiatry
    University of California, San Francisco

    Stephen Hinshaw, PhD, a leader in the field of developmental psychopathology, investigates the earliest signs and progression of childhood psychiatric disorders, particularly attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In April 2013 Dr. Hinshaw became the Vice-Chair for Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco. He is also a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the former president of the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. The journal he edits, Psychological Bulletin, has an impact factor of 15.6, making it the most cited journal in all of psychology. The second edition of his Development Psychopathology text came out this past winter and his new book, The ADHD Explosion, comes out in January. He has also ...

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  • Bennett Leventhal
    Bennett Leventhal, MD

    Co-Chair
    Scientific Research Council

    Deputy Director
    Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research

    Irving B. Harris Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Emeritus
    University of Chicago

    Bennett Leventhal, MD, is widely recognized for his leadership and expertise in fostering career development and training programs as well as collaborative research networks that focus on everything from molecular genetics to community service and public health. His direction and vision have led to the creation of nationally prominent clinical research programs that continue to shape how we study childhood psychiatric disorders. Dr. Leventhal has championed initiatives to advance research on the molecular genetics of autism, the prenatal origins of disruptive behavior disorders, and the brain mechanisms that interfere with social functioning. He also helped establish a global network of scientists who are currently investigating the origins of mental health disorders that emerge during the first few years of life.

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  • Judy Cameron
    Judy Cameron, PhD

    Member
    Scientific Research Council

    Professor of Psychiatry
    University of Pittsburgh

    Senior Scientist; Affiliate Scientist; Professor of Behavioral Neuroscience
    Oregon National Primate Research Center

    Judy Cameron, PhD, a renowned researcher of stress and resilience, has devoted her career to understanding how stressful experiences interact with genetic factors and can affect cardiovascular, reproductive, and immune functions, as well as the development of mental health disorders such as anxiety and depression. She has tracked the developmental course of monkeys to uncover what makes some individuals more sensitive and others more resilient to stress—work that has profound implications for the development of prevention and early intervention programs for human physical and mental health. A major figure in the field of behavioral neuroscience, she continues to lead research that may one day enable clinicians to identify which individuals are most vulnerable to stress-sensitive diseases.

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  • F. Xavier Castellanos
    F. Xavier Castellanos, MD

    Member
    Scientific Research Council

    Brooke and Daniel Neidich Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry; Professor of Radiology; Director of Research; Director of the Phyllis Green and Randolph Cowen Institute for Pediatric Neuroscience
    NYU School of Medicine

    F. Xavier Castellanos, MD, a renowned neuroscientist, has devoted his career to developing innovative research techniques to deepen our understanding of both healthy and pathological brain processes. Dr. Castellanos is the vice-chair of research in the NYU Child Study Center, director of Center's Phyllis Green and Randolph Cowen Institute for Pediatric Neuroscience, Brooke and Daniel Neidich Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and professor of radiology and physiology and neuroscience at the NYU School of Medicine. Prior to joining the NYU faculty, Dr. Castellanos worked for 10 years as a staff physician and chief of the ADHD Research Unit at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). As co-chair of the American Psychiatric Association Workgroup on ADHD and Disruptive Behavior Disorders, he is a ...

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  • Rachel Klein
    Rachel Klein, PhD

    Member
    Scientific Research Council

    Fascitelli Family Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry; Director, Institute for Anxiety and Mood Disorders
    NYU School of Medicine

    Rachel Klein, PhD, a renowned researcher, has devoted her career to studying treatments for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), learning disorders, anxiety disorders, and depression. Her longitudinal studies have demonstrated the need for early identification of childhood psychiatric disorders, large-scale prevention programs, and individualized treatment plans. As director of the NYU Child Study Center’s Anita Saltz Institute for Anxiety and Mood Disorders, Dr. Klein has mentored many of the nation’s leading researchers in child and adolescent psychiatry. She has been a key contributor to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual and is currently at work on the next revision, the DSM-V, due out in 2013. Her many honors include the Joy and William Ruane Prize for Research in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and a National ...

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  • Joseph LeDoux
    Joseph LeDoux, PhD

    Member
    Scientific Research Council

    Professor of Neuroscience and Psychology
    NYU Center for Neural Science

    Founder & Director, The Emotional Brain Institute
    Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research

    Joseph LeDoux, PhD, is one of the nation’s leading neuroscientists. His groundbreaking research has deepened our understanding of the brain mechanisms underlying emotion and memory, opening the door to new treatments, specifically behavioral therapies, for children and adults with anxiety disorders. Dr. LeDoux is founding director of the Emotional Brain Institute and director of The Center for the Neuroscience of Fear and Anxiety at NYU’s Center for Neural Science. He is the author of The Emotional Brain: The Mysterious Underpinnings of Emotional Life and The Synaptic Self: How Our Brains Become Who We Are, in addition to numerous scholarly articles. His many honors include the 2005 Fyssen International Prize in Cognitive Science.

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  • Catherine Lord
    Catherine Lord, PhD

    Member
    Scientific Research Council

    Director, Institute for Brain Development
    New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medical College and Columbia University Medical Center

    Catherine Lord, PhD, is widely known for her groundbreaking longitudinal studies of children with autism. Her work has been key in the development of diagnostic tools that are now used worldwide to identify children on the autism spectrum. Dr. Lord is a senior scientist at the Center for Human Growth and Development and a professor of psychology and psychiatry at the University of Michigan, where she has conducted research on the neurobiological, genetic, and environmental causes of autism. Her recent work on a follow-up study of teens diagnosed with autism at age two is providing new insight into the course of autism and the effectiveness of treatments.

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  • Bruce McEwen
    Bruce McEwen, PhD

    Member
    Scientific Research Council

    Head of the Harold and Margaret Milliken Hatch Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology; Alfred E. Mirsky Professor
    The Rockefeller University

    Bruce McEwen, PhD, a prominent neuroscientist, leads research on the effects of sex, stress, and hormones on the brain. In 1968, his laboratory discovered adrenal steroid receptors in the hippocampus—a truly seminal discovery. His current research focuses on how stress affects particular areas of the brain, including the amygdala, prefrontal cortex, and hippocampus. He is also investigating how brain regions differ between men and women. Dr. McEwen’s research has significantly deepened our understanding of how the brain changes over the course of development, from childhood to old age, and it continues to shine new light upon the causes and progression of psychiatric illnesses, particularly post-traumatic stress disorder and depression.

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  • Daniel Pine
    Daniel Pine, MD

    Member
    Scientific Research Council

    Chief, Section on Development and Affective Neuroscience; Chief, Emotion and Development Branch; Chief of Child and Adolescent Research in the Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program
    National Institute of Mental Health

    Daniel Pine, MD, is one of the nation’s foremost experts on mood and anxiety disorders. His research has shaped our understanding of how key brain structures such as the amygdala and prefrontal cortex change over time and play critical roles in illness and health. He has also led studies to broaden our knowledge of the biological commonalities and differences among psychiatric disorders in children, adolescents, and adults. A leader in the development of diagnostic tools and treatments for childhood psychiatric disorders, Dr. Pine has published hundreds of scientific papers and chaired the Food and Drug Administration’s Psychopharmacology Drug Advisory Board. His many honors include the Blanche Ittelson Award from the American Psychiatric Association for outstanding research contributions to the field of child psychiatry ...

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  • Neal Ryan
    Neal Ryan, MD

    Member
    Scientific Research Council

    Professor of Psychiatry
    University of Pittsburgh

    Neal Ryan, MD, is one of the nation’s leading experts on pediatric mood and anxiety disorders. He has led large-scale studies of behavioral changes in children and adolescents diagnosed with mood disorders, and he has investigated the effectiveness of medications and various other treatments, including innovative cognitive-behavioral therapies. Dr. Ryan’s ongoing studies of the pharmacological treatment of unipolar and bipolar depression in adolescents have inspired many graduate students to pursue careers in child and adolescent psychiatry. He is currently principal investigator on a large NIMH-funded project titled “Psychobiology of Childhood Anxiety and Depression.” He has co-authored numerous scholarly articles and remains an important public voice on the causes and treatment of mental health disorders in children and adolescents.

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  • Irwin Sandler
    Irwin Sandler, PhD

    Member
    Scientific Research Council

    Regents’ Professor - Department of Psychology (Clinical)
    Arizona State University

    Director of Prevention Research Center
    Arizona State University

    Irwin Sandler, PhD, has devoted much of his career to researching the effects of high stress situations on children. His research has focused on the assessment of children's stressful life events, coping strategies and social support and on testing theoretical models of children's adaptation to stress. He has also conducted extensive research to experimentally test the long-term impact of interventions to promote healthy child adjustment following the stressors of parental death and divorce.  Throughout his career he has focused on the translation between theories of adaptation and the design of preventive interventions and on using experimental trials of interventions to test theoretically predicted models of adaptation. Dr. Sandler served for 25 years as the director of the NIMH supported Prevention Research Center at ...

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  • Matthew State
    Matthew State, MD, PhD

    Member
    Scientific Research Council

    Professor of Child Psychiatry and Psychiatry; Professor of Genetics; Co-Director, Yale Program on Neurogenetics; Deputy Chairman for Research in the Department of Psychiatry
    Yale University School of Medicine

    Matthew State, MD, PhD, is a leading child psychiatrist whose laboratory focuses on identifying and characterizing the genes and genetic mechanisms involved in the development of childhood psychiatric disorders. His research has placed special emphasis on understanding the contribution of gene mutations to Tourette’s disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and a range of pervasive developmental disorders, including autism. Dr. State’s lab was the first to identify mutations in the gene SLITRK1 in Tourette’s disorder—work that was cited by Science Magazine as a top scientific breakthrough of 2005. A master clinician, Dr. State sees patients, supervises Yale residents and fellows at a community mental health center, and serves as the psychiatric consultant for a residential treatment facility for teens and young adults with autism.  

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  • Regina Sullivan
    Regina Sullivan, PhD

    Member
    Scientific Research Council

    Research Scientist, The Emotional Brain Institute
    Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research

    Research Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
    NYU School of Medicine

    Regina Sullivan, PhD, is a widely respected research scientist whose groundbreaking studies show how early experiences can affect the developing brains of children. Her research has demonstrated that early childhood trauma can alter the structure and functioning of the amygdala, the area of the brain that controls emotional regulation and learning, and her most recent work highlights the importance of a caregiver’s presence in determining how the infant brain processes trauma. Among her most intriguing findings is that parenting practices may ameliorate the effects of trauma on the developing brain. Dr. Sullivan lectures widely and has published articles in numerous books, peer-reviewed journals, and professional publications. 

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