The Child Mind BlogBrainstorm

  • Even With Outpatient Mental Health Care, Kids Visit Emergency Room
    June 1, 2011 Science Daily

    A surprising majority of children making a return visit to the ER because of behavior problems or psychiatric issues have an outpatient mental health provider, according to a new study. The Johns Hopkins researchers tracked a cohort that made two visits within 6 months of each other, ScienceDaily reports, and were intrigued to find not only that two thirds of families had access to care outside of the ER on the first visit; by the second visit that number was 85 percent. "It is possible that ERs fulfill an important function," said one pediatric psychiatrist, "in the continuum of care for non-psychotic, non-suicidal patients." The researchers are quick to call for more research, particularly into the specifics of the relationship between outpatient visits and visits to the ER, but the study suggests at least that a serious incident encourages families to seek ongoing care—and that the people who provide that care may be lacking sufficient resources.

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  • Gender Debate: Role Playing, From School to the Sandbox
    May 31, 2011 The Toronto Star

    The Toronto Star has a new article exploring how gender is formed in children. This time Jayme Poisson, the reporter who bought us the original article about the Canadian couple that decided to keep their four-month-old child's gender a secret, interviews several parents about the gender biases they see in their own children. Poisson also quotes the president of CMI, Dr. Harold S. Koplewicz, who notes that there are distinct differences between boys and girls that are apparent even from birth.

    Know More:  Dr. Koplewicz on Bringing Up Baby Without Gender

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  • Autism Makes Distinct Changes to Brain’s Gene Patterns
    May 27, 2011 Bloomberg

    New research shows that there are well-defined genetic patterns in the brains of all people with autism. Researchers expect that learning more about these patterns, which occur regardless of an individual's symptoms, will help identify causes of autism and may result in new methods of treatment. Robert Ring of the advocacy group Autism Speaks notes, "This finding teaches us that there may be a final common gene activity network from many different mutations. This opens a new target space for thinking about therapeutic intervention."

    Know More:  Why Combine Autism and Asperger's?

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  • 'The View' Discusses the Genderless Baby Too
    May 27, 2011 The View

    The View is also talking about the Canadian couple that decided to raise their child without gender. Watch the discussion and take note—Barbara Walters quotes CMI President Dr. Koplewicz from his appearance on the Today show.

    Know More:  Bringing Up Baby Without Gender 

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  • Near-Instant Blood Test to Diagnose Depression
    May 26, 2011 The Telegraph

    Researchers have developed a new test that can diagnose depression by measuring the concentration of phosphoric acid in a person's blood. Past studies have shown that blood tests can diagnose depressed patients at an 82 percent success rate, and with nearly instantaneous results. In an interview with the Telegraph Dr. Yoshiaki Ohashi, a board member of the research group behind the study, claimed, "The findings will make it easier for an objective, biological diagnosis of depressive patients. We believe that the use of such a test will make it possible to diagnose patients efficiently at the primary care stage." The blood test may be available for popular use within the next two years.

    Know More:  Is It Depression or Just Teen Angst?

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  • 'Storm’ of Controversy Over Gender-Free Parenting
    May 26, 2011 The Today Show

    Dr. Harold Koplewicz appeared on the Today show this morning to discuss the controversial decision by one Canadian couple to raise their child without gender. "What we really want is we want kids to like their bodies," Dr. Koplewicz notes. "And we don't care if they wear pink or blue or if there's a girl who wants to play baseball—that's really terrific parenting. But what we don't want to do is confuse a child and keep secrets."

    Know More:  Bringing Up Baby Without Gender

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  • Loughner Ruled Incompetent to Stand Trial
    May 25, 2011 Los Angeles Times

    Jared Lee Loughner, the man allegedly responsible for the Tucson shooting that killed six and injured 12 others, including Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, has been declared incompetent to stand trial. Loughner will remain in custody and will not stand trial unless he is rehabilitated and declared able to understand the charges against him.

    Know More:  The Lesson From Tucson: Treat Mental Illness

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  • Is This Baby a Boy or Girl?
    May 24, 2011 New York Times

    Parenting blog Motherlode is reporting on the Canadian couple that made the extreme decision to raise their four-month-old without gender. The child is named Storm, and although Storm's parents naturally know the child's true biological sex, they're keeping it a secret from everyone else until he (or she!) decides to make the formal announcement. In an email to family and friends, they wrote, "We've decided not to share Storm's sex for now—a tribute to freedom and choice in place of limitation, a stand up to what the world could become in Storm's lifetime (a more progressive place? ...)." As might be expected, public response to their decision has been controversial. Storm's grandparents, who are in on the secret, are being supportive, although they do say they're tired of explaining the situation to co-workers. Hopefully the decision isn't all just a publicity stunt for a reality show, as one Motherlode commenter fears.

    Know More:  In Praise of Pink Polish

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  • 'Glee' Campaigns Against the R-Word
    May 24, 2011 R-Word.org

    Glee, the Fox hit that celebrates diversity, will do just that during tonight's finale by airing "Not Acceptable," a new public service announcement aimed at abolishing the use of the "R-word": retard.  The shocking 30-second PSA, from the Spread the Word to End the Word Campaign, begins with representatives from different groups using once-common terms for them that are now seen as offensive, and ends with Glee's Lauren Potter, who has Down syndome, and Jane Lynch calling for the end to the use of the R-word, which is "the same as every minority slur," Lynch says. "Treat it that way and don't use it." On the show, Lynch's nasty character, Sue Sylvester, has exposed her soft side by taking Potter's character Becky under her wing. Little has been made of Becky's disability since she was first introduced on the show, which also features the wheelchair-bound Artie and gay, bullied Kurt. The PSA also aims to promote the acceptance and inclusion of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Besides Fox, MTV, TNT, CNN and several other networks have committed to airing it.

     

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  • One in Six Kids Have a Developmental Disability
    May 23, 2011 USA Today

    New research shows that one in six children have a developmental disability. While this number has risen 17% in the last 12 years, researchers note this doesn't necessarily mean that more kids have developmental disabilities. Instead, the increase shows that the children who would have been ignored several years ago are now receiving treatment for their disorders, particularly kids with ADHD and autism. Alison Schonwald of Children's Hospital Boston says the increase is good news. "It's much more daunting to think of the number of adults out there who have never been identified and served."

    Know More:  The Cost of Not Treating ADHD in Children

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